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For ten years a magazine called Bidoun appeared roughly every once in a while, sometimes four times a year, all over the world, almost never in the same shop twice…

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Dear Jane: A Celebration of Jane Bowles at Artists Space

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On the occasion of her centenary, an evening in honor of Jane Bowles

FEATURING

A puppet play by Jane Bowles, staged by Nick Mauss, starring Deborah Eisenberg and Lynne Tillman

READINGS BY

Gini Alhadeff
Negar Azimi
Yto Barrada
Lidija Haas
James Hannaham
Fran Lebowitz
Tiffany Malakooti
Nick Mauss
Ariana Reines
Christine Smallwood
Pamela Sneed
Emily Stokes

The writer Jane Bowles passed away too early—in 1973 at the age of 56 after having spent two decades in the Moroccan port city of Tangier. At Tennessee Williams’ urging, The New York Times gave her a proper obituary, quoting John Ashbery: “Few surface literary reputations are as glamorous as the underground one she has enjoyed.” And yet despite her cultish following, she remains unknown to swathes of readers. The occasion of the Library of America’s publication of her collected works offers up a chance to look at her astonishing, antic work anew.

Organized by Bidoun with Negar Azimi, Pati Hertling, Tiffany Malakooti, and Lynne Tillman.


 Copies of Jane Bowles: Collected Writings (Library of America, 2017), edited by Millicent Dillon, will be available in the bookshop.

Monday, January 23, 2017, 7pm
Artists Space Books & Talks
55 Walker Street, New York
$5 Entrance

The Pearl Cannon

The barren and the impotent, the debutante and the bachelor, the spinster and the wench — all gathered around the miraculous cannon on Charshanbe Soori.

London’s Nocturnal Blues: Beyond the bling

At night on the Thames, skippers of elderly tugboats tell horrified and delighted deckhands about the headless torsos of African girls found washed up on the shore downriver the previous week.

The Natural Orders

If Water Is Precious to You We use the latest Western technology.

Islamic Chic: Only in America can a poor black boy grow up to be a rich white woman

Malcolm X did it, Cat Stevens did it, and even simpleminded Mike Tyson did it. And if you blinked you might have missed it, but Michael Jackson, too, fell in love with Islam.

Driving Miss Deneuve: Je Veux Voir

She meets him for the first time in the morning and that night introduces him as a friend, smiling her legendarily blank yet overpowering smile at him.